Dubucand, Alfred (French, 1828-1894)

Return To Glossary

Alfred Dubucand (1828-1894) was a French animalier sculptor who was active in the mid-to-late 19th century. Primarily working from Paris, Dubucand soon became the star pupil of another famous animalier sculptor, Antoine-Louis Bayre. Taking inspiration from Bayre, Dubucand regularly experimented with chemical patinas, creating the distinctive work that we see today.

Dubucand’s sculpture is prized not only for its appearance, but because of his use of the wax casting method. This technique, which involved casting the original work in wax and then in bronze, is no longer extant. Dubucand placed great emphasis on the importance of naturalism in his work, and paid strict attention to the anatomical detail of his subjects; by using the wax casting method, he could attain the specificity of detail desired.

Throughout the course of his career, Dubucand frequently contributed works to the famous annual Salon art exhibition in Paris. The sculptor is celebrated as highly today as he was in his own time, owing to the skill and beauty of his work.