Tiffany & Co. (American, est. 1837)

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Tiffany & Co. is one of the biggest and most famous American retailers and jewellers of objets d’art and jewellery. The firm was established in 1837 by Charles Lewis Tiffany and John B. Youngs in Brooklyn as a ‘stationery and fancy goods emporium’ and it has flourished into the 21st Century into a beacon of luxury, style and design.

In 1845, shortly after their establishment, Tiffany pioneered the ‘Blue Book’ to sell their goods, which was the first ever mail-order catalogue in the US and is still one of the most distinctive innovations.

Growing in popularity thanks to the newly emerging ‘American style’ of wares by Tiffany, the firm received international recognition at the 1867 Exposition Universelle in Paris, France, winning the grand prize for their craftsmanship in silver.

By 1870, Tiffany was the most celebrated silversmith and retailer of timepieces and fine jewels, expanding to London, Paris and Geneva.

Notably, in 1878, Tiffany acquired the famous 287.42 carat ‘Fancy’ yellow diamond from South Africa, which was later cut into a 128.54 carat gemstone, which was set into the necklace that was worn by Audrey Hepburn in the publicity shots for the famous 1961 film ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’. The gemstone is kept in the Tiffany New York flagship store today.

From 1878 onward, Tiffany’s reputation for fine jewellery, objets d’art and astonishing gemstones grew and grew. They began working with acclaimed designers and the brand developed a cult status among celebrities and even the aristocracy.

Today, Tiffany is one of the pre-eminent names in jewellery with over 300 stores worldwide, and the firm has gained an international reputation synonymous with the romance and beauty of fine jewellery innovation.